The Book Thief

by Markus Zusak

I have put off reading this book having read widely varied reviews. It seems that the book’s critics fall into one of two camps: those who get it and those who don’t. And I have to say that I am very firmly in the former. I not only got it, I loved it. from the very first page, I was captivated by the unique narrative style and almost as quickly entranced by the character.

It is the story of a young girl – Liesel Meminger – growing up in Nazi Germany of the early 1940s. The twist is that the story is told by Death, based on Liesel’s own words. Death first comes across the nine-year-old Liesel as she heads towards Munich on board a train with her mother and her little brother. It is an encounter that will change her life forever.

I can appreciate that the style of the narration may put some people off, but for me, the unusual way in which the story unfolds adds to the attraction of the book as a whole.

Dealing as it does with life during war-time Germany, it inevitably deals with subjects like the Holocaust and the Nazi party’s domination of ordinary people’s lives. The book deals with these things through the eyes of Liesel and passes no judgement other than her sense of injustice at the things she sees and hears. But it is not all doom and gloom. Liesel becomes very close to her stepfather, Hans, who instils in her a sense of hope and a love for reading. And it’s reading and a love of books that get her through the worst of times.

Of course, there have been innumerable books covering Nazi activities during the war years. Life in Germany and occupied Europe has been well documented but never quite like this. I found the whole thing to be very moving and totally captivating. 

The Book Thief is a great book that I felt deserves the positive critical acclaim it received.