Northanger Abbey

Northanger Abbeyby Jane Austen

Jane Austen’s books are like dear old friends. Not the kind you spend every weekend with, but the one whose company is no less welcome and warming fr its infrequency.

Northanger Abbey is a particular favourite of mine, mainly because of the style. It differs from her other works in that she uses direct author intrusion to speak directly with the reader. It is clear that she is telling you a story and often takes control of the narrative. Despite this change in style, it loses none of the wit and observational skills that are very much the hallmark of Austen’s work.

In Northanger Abbey, Austen’s would-be heroin Catherine Moorland sets out on her first adventure beyond the family home. She is t spend 6 weeks in Bath with her neighbours, Mr and Mrs Allen. Catherine is determined to find adventure but her hopes are dashed as their lack of acquaintances leaves them sidelined from society. However, two chance encounters soon end this initial isolation and propel Catherine into a series of events and friendships that offer more opportunity for adventure than she could have hoped for.

Catherine Moorland is an innocent propelled into society she cannot fully comprehend. The direct honesty she is used to has not prepared her for the deceitful and ambiguous nature of those who claim her as their friend. She thinks the best of everyone but she soon begins to realise that not everyone is as honest about their feelings as she is.

Whilst it might not be to everyone’s taste, Northanger Abbey is a pastiche of the gothic tales of the time and is a book I enjoy revisiting.